when it all changed


Today, Cinco de Mayo, is a day that my life changed. 7 years ago today my job was eliminated at Microsoft. I loved my job, working with some of the smartest people in technology who blew me away with their brilliance. I loved working with the studio publicists who were so good at their jobs. I loved seeing them every weekend in LA and watching them manage what must have been massive undertakings at junkets (done with style and cool). I loved my fellow journalists and reporters from around the world and the junket teams that worked like a well oiled machine. So many adventures. I still miss them all to this day. Covering entertainment and interviewing celebrities was the coolest job I could have ever imagined.

That morning of 5/5/09 when I was part of the Cinco de Mayo layoffs and told it was over (and it was AWFUL), it felt like the end of the world. I was decimated. It was humiliating. It turns out, however, that it was exactly what I needed to happen. After about a million miles in the air (and trying to start a family while doing that) I was able to spend more time with Larry and Emma. Feeling sick of being depressed and feeling sorry for myself, I started a company called The Happygirl, a guide to getting your happy back.

Later, I had the unexpected PROFOUND experience to work as the Director of Advancement at my high school alma mater in my hometown 2800 miles away. Seeing my Senior English teacher, Sr. Marlene, every day was one of the coolest things I've ever had the chance to do. We got an interesting loft in an historic sword forge building in my hometown and I reconnected with family (and the most fun nieces EVER!) and friends I love that I've known since I was in first grade. I made new friends who I came to love. It's hard to imagine my life without them now. For a girl without parents in her life or any siblings, this was more wonderful that I can put into words.

On May 5, 2009, I felt destroyed, leveled, humiliated and embarrassed. I learned though, that every experience brings you to where you are now. I learned that a loss, a tragedy, an unexpected pause in your life can be the best thing that ever happened to you. My relationship with God became more meaningful to me. I learned to be grateful for what I have and to honor the experiences I had--the magical, incredible ones as well as the tragic losses and the ones that hurt and humbled me to my core.

No, things didn't turn out as I had planned. It was better. Wildly, unimaginably better.